Wednesday, January 19, 2011

A thank you note

When I'm done writing this, I should probably send it to Glenn Beck.
Dear Glenn Beck,
I felt compelled to write you this note to thank you for the contributions you are making to our society in the U.S. I am a regular watcher of your television show. I honestly can't remember when I first started watching, but I do remember why. My family has always been interested in politics and preserving the God-given freedoms that we enjoy in this country. My younger brother has been a huge fan of yours and showed me the video of your conversion to the LDS faith. I felt a connection with this and your fact-based, Constitution-based ideology. I watched my brother add the books that you would recommend to his perpetual Christmas list. We would have Saturday discussions after watching taped episodes of your show. I started taping your show at home and would watch it late at night. My youngest sister and her family attended the Rally to Restore Honor. We enviously watched from home. I appreciate the research that you do and share with your audience.
I also recently finished reading your book with Dr. Keith Ablow, The 7 Wonders That Will Change Your Life. It was really the perfect time in my life to read this book.  I am a conservative woman living in Arizona. In light of the recent events in Tucson, this is a somewhat difficult position. I was extremely upset by the senseless disregard for human life taken by the shooter. As I listened to and read the news about the events, I was disturbed by the rush to judgement that the shooter must have been driven by the conservative talkers. I began to get angry and spend more time reading and watching people placing blame for this man's actions on others. Thankfully, at this time I was also reading the section of your book on compassion. I realized that, while one can and should still work to correct misconceptions, my being angry at rash commentary was not improving the situation. I was able to let go of my anger and focus on reasonable discourse on the great chasm of truth in our society.
Additonally, I have never been an alcoholic or addicted to drugs, but I appreciated the honesty and depth of feeling in your stories of overcoming these trials. Of course, I do have trials of my own. I recently left my teaching job after 5 years of feeling that I was spending more of my time on other people's children than my own. My husband and I have struggled with financial issues. My father had a stroke that left him paralyzed on one side of his body and my mother was coming into a situation where she would be caring for him on her own 24/7. (She is lucky/blessed enough to have several therapists who come to their home.) We prayerfully decided (with my mom) that we should move into her large home to help her care for my dad. I have worried about not making a financial contribution to our family situation. I am now looking for breadcrumbs, some of which I may have overlooked, that will help me follow the path that will be helpful to me and my family.
Finally, I just want to restate my thanks to you for your contribution. I've read several of your other books and enjoyed them as well. This one really resonated with me. I took notes. When I finished, I started making lists of things that I love to do. (I really love history!) I've started thinking back to the inspiration that has been given to me and looking for future inspiration. Thank you for sharing this book and your experiences with me.


Monique Fullmer